Category Archives: Market Spotlight

Astronomy: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Astronomy, a monthly magazine covering the science and hobby of astronomy.

Established in 1973, Astronomy is a monthly magazine covering the science and hobby of astronomy. The magazine shares stories on the science of astronomy, cosmology, and more for astronomy enthusiasts.

(Analog Science Fiction and Fact: Market Spotlight.)

The editors say, "Astronomy magazine is really a story of the people behind it. Dedicated by an obsession with the subject of astronomy, they are driven to assemble the best, most-absorbing material relating to the world of astronomy with every page they have."

What They're Looking For

Most of the articles in Astronomy are commissioned by the editors, but they also encourage pitches from freelancers. Freelancers can pitch one of two types of articles: Science features and hobby features. 

For the science features, editors are looking for descriptive pieces that focus on a particular type of astronomical object or scientific process; news features focus on an area of research and give readers an in-depth look at recent events; and human-interest pieces featuring personalities, historical events, and special topics such as education and archaeoastronomy. 

For the hobby features, editors want pieces explaining where to find and how to view celestial objects and include sky maps, diagrams, and illustrations; photography and imaging features that provide how-to advice on capturing portraits of celestial objects on film or in digital format; and equipment pieces that range from product reviews to surveys of telescopes and accessories.

The editors say, "The magazine's articles must go beyond presenting facts; they must tell a story. The first two or three paragraphs (the 'lead') must grab the readers' attention and tell them what the article is about. The article should contain a thread, or argument, that develops in a coherent direction as details supporting the lead are delivered and should end in a meaningful conclusion that summarizes its content."

Article length is between 1,500 and 3,000 words.

How to Submit

Potential writers can submit queries or outlines describing their piece via their web-based form or by post (Astronomy magazine, P.O. Box 1612, Waukesha WI 53187).

The editors say, "If you have not been published in Astronomy, please send writing samples along with your letter."

Click here to learn more and submit.

*****

No other market is as open to the freelance writer as the magazine market. From trade and association publications, to special interest magazines, to regional and national consumer publications, editors are looking for writers who can deliver well-researched, reader-targeted articles on deadline. To make it in this market, you want to learn how to identify a magazine's editorial needs and—most important—how to fill them.

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Nowhere Magazine: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Nowhere, an online literary travel magazine. Open call for submissions until September 30, 2020.

Nowhere is an online literary travel magazine that launched in 2008. By literary travel, they mean narrative travel pieces with a "strong sense of place, character and time."

(The Sun Magazine: Market Spotlight.)

The editors say, "We were tired of reading—and writing—marketing-driven travel stories that have taken over much of the travel media world. We wanted to bring back old school, immersive, long-form travel writing like Holiday, Colliers and the Saturday Evening Post used to run. Jack Kerouac was a travel writer back then. Arthur Miller was a travel writer. Hemingway, Faulkner, Jan Morris, Steinbeck and Mary McCarthy were travel writers."

While this market offers money for its writing contests, it is not a paying market for their open calls for submissions.

What They're Looking For

Nowhere is completely freelance written, with 30 percent of stories from first-time writers.

The editors say, "We don't take just anything; submitting is competitive, and our staff focuses a keen eye on narrative, setting, character, story arc, detail, research, reporting and authenticity. With 50 years of editing experience in the travel world on our masthead, the editing process is comprehensive—making your work look its best before publishing. We also nominate our authors for prestigious literary prizes each year."

Their audience wants long-form, complex stories for people who love to read. Nowhere accepts nonfiction, fiction, and poetry.

How to Submit

Potential writers can submit stories or poems via their Submittable page here.

The editors say, "We publish traditional features as well as travelogues, journal excerpts, character sketches, profiles, conversations, poetry, reviews, notes, video, audio… We like rich detail, elliptical story lines, unusual perspective, lean, evocative writing and tight collections of perhaps a dozen thematic images. We'd love to see a story about a Kansas City street corner that is significant for some reason. We don't want destination, how-to or service fluff of any kind."

Click here to learn more and submit.

*****

No other market is as open to the freelance writer as the magazine market. From trade and association publications, to special interest magazines, to regional and national consumer publications, editors are looking for writers who can deliver well-researched, reader-targeted articles on deadline. To make it in this market, you want to learn how to identify a magazine's editorial needs and—most important—how to fill them.

Click to continue.

Cripple Magazine: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Cripple Magazine, an online and print magazine curated and run by young disabled creatives.

Cripple Magazine is an online and print magazine curated and run by young disabled creatives. It was founded by Emily Flores, a 15-year-old journalist with a disability who wanted to provide a platform for young disabled creatives.

(The Sun Magazine: Market Spotlight.)

The editors say, "From parents to doctors to well-read researchers, adults often spend time in conversations surrounding and about young disabled people. It’s time that we start hearing from the young disabled people themselves, and see how they want to be represented in real life and in media."

While this market does not have a budget to pay for pieces, it is a good publication opportunity for writers between the ages of 13 and 18.

What They're Looking For

Cripple Magazine is looking for passionate and young (13 to 18) disabled writers, editors, and artists.

The editors say, "Know that even though our magazine is geared towards young people with disabilities and the call-out culture of ableism, submissions and contributions from artists and writers can be professional pieces about any topic you want. They can be pieces about fashion, politics, social justice, or even pieces about the latest drama on YouTube."

They are open to all young, disabled creatives, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, location, or other identifiers. 

How to Submit

Potential writers can apply for a writing position here. Or they can pitch an article via email at submissions@cripplemagazine.com.

Click here to learn more and submit.

*****

No other market is as open to the freelance writer as the magazine market. From trade and association publications, to special interest magazines, to regional and national consumer publications, editors are looking for writers who can deliver well-researched, reader-targeted articles on deadline. To make it in this market, you want to learn how to identify a magazine's editorial needs and—most important—how to fill them.

Click to continue.

Virginia Quarterly Review: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Virginia Quarterly Review, a literary journal looking for top-notch fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Submission period open through July 31, 2020.

Virginia Quarterly Review (or VQR) is a literary journal looking for top-notch fiction, poetry, and nonfiction.

(The Sun Magazine: Market Spotlight.)

The editors say, "From its inception in prohibition, through depression and war, in prosperity and peace, the Virginia Quarterly Review has been a haven—and home—for the best essayists, fiction writers, and poets, seeking contributors from every section of the United States and abroad. It has not limited itself to any special field. No topic has been alien: literary, public affairs, the arts, history, the economy. If it could be approached through essay or discussion, poetry or prose, VQR has covered it."

VQR pays $200 per poem, up to four poems; collections of five or more usually earns $1,000. For prose (fiction and nonfiction), they pay 25¢ per word. Book reviews are $500, and online content generally earns $100-200 per piece. 

What They're Looking For

VQR publishes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, literary criticism, book reviews, and more.

The editors say, "VQR strives to publish the best writing we can find. While we have a long history of publishing accomplished and award-winning authors, we also seek and support emerging writers."

The editors consider all forms of poetry. For fiction, they shy away from genre fiction like romance and science fiction and fantasy, and they look for stories of 3,500 to 8,000 words.

For nonfiction, they publish literary criticism, reportage, historical and political analysis, and travel essays. As the editors say, "In general, we are looking for nonfiction that looks out on the world, rather than within the self."

How to Submit

Potential writers should submit via their Submittable page by July 31, 2020.

For poetry, poets can submit up to four poems (fewer than 15 pages). For fiction and nonfiction, writers should submit one story or piece for each reading period.

Click here to learn more and submit.

*****

No other market is as open to the freelance writer as the magazine market. From trade and association publications, to special interest magazines, to regional and national consumer publications, editors are looking for writers who can deliver well-researched, reader-targeted articles on deadline. To make it in this market, you want to learn how to identify a magazine's editorial needs and—most important—how to fill them.

Click to continue.