Category Archives: The Writer’s Life

Literary World Records for Books and Authors

In this post, Don Vaughan reveals literary world records. Ever wonder which author sold the most books? Or which book has been translated the most times? How about which author has signed the most copies of their book on a single day?

World records tend to celebrate extremes: The largest, smallest, oldest, youngest, rarest. Such records can apply to just about anything—including books. In fact, Guinness World Records devotes an entire section to extraordinary book- and author-related achievements. 

Let’s explore a few of them.

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Book World Records

Size is always an impressive world record, whether we’re talking about the world’s tallest man (currently Sultan Kosan of Turkey, 8-feet, 2.8 inches) or the world’s largest book. The latter record is held by a tome titled This the Prophet Mohamed, which measures a massive 16.40 feet by 26.44 feet and weighs 3,306 pounds. It was produced by Mshahed International Group of Dubai, EAU, and debuted in February 2012.

On the other end of the spectrum, the smallest reproduction of a printed book is Teeny Ted from Turnip Town, by Malcolm Douglas Chaplin. Researchers at Canada’s Simon Fraser University used an ion beam to etch the book on a pure crystalline silicon page measuring just 70 micrometers by 30 micrometers—a size so small you’ll need a scanning electron microscope to read it. Fun fact: Teeny Ted from Turnip Town even has its own ISBN.

A rather unusual book-related world record was set in October 2015 when staff from Sinners Domino Entertainment in Germany successfully toppled 10,200 copies of Guinness World Records 2016 domino style during the Frankfurt Book Fair. No word on who had to pick them up afterward.

If you thought your book collection was big, consider the personal library owned by John Q. Benham of Acova, Indiana. According to Guinness World Records, Benham’s personal collection is the largest in the world with more than 1.5 million volumes. It fills a six-car garage and two-story building, with additional books stored outdoors under tarpaulins.

(The 30-book challenge.)

Not all books end up in collections, of course; many are discarded after reading. A 2010 survey of more than 450 Travelodges in Britain found that the book most commonly left behind by guests was Simon Cowell: The Unauthorized Biography, by Chas Newkey-Burden.

Author World Records

Authors have also set a good number of interesting world records over the years. For example, the youngest commercially published female author is Dorothy Straight of Washington, D.C., who penned How the World Began in 1962 at age 4. The book was published two years later by Pantheon Books. The current holder of the world record for youngest published male author is Thanuwana Serasinghe of Sri Lanka, who was 4 years, 356 days old when his book Junk Food was published in January 2017. The book took Serasinghe three days to write.

It likely will come as no surprise that the best-selling author for fiction is the legendary Agatha Christie, whose 78 novels have sold a combined total of more than two billion copies in 44 languages. However, the record for most books sold in a 24-hour period belongs to J.K. Rowling. Demand for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows was so strong that an estimated 8.3 million copies flew off store shelves upon its release at 12:01 a.m. on July 21, 2007. Rowling also is the world’s first billion-dollar author.

(12 magical quotes from The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.)

Though Rowling’s works are astonishingly popular, she falls far behind Antoine de Saint-Exupéry as the most translated author of a single book. Saint-Exupéry’s classic children’s tale The Little Prince has been translated into 383 different languages and dialects since its first publication in April 1943.

Of course, writing and selling a book is never easy. To promote their latest works, authors often host signing events. The current king of signings is Indian author Vickrant Mahahan, who signed a staggering 6,904 copies of his book Yes Thank You Universe in Jammu, India, on January 30, 2016.

(Why do authors cross out their name when signing a book?)

If you see that as a challenge, you’re not alone—world records are made to be broken. So keep writing. Perhaps someday you’ll be recognized by Guinness World Records for a remarkable literary achievement of your own.

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How Artificial Intelligence Can Help Authors Write a Better Novel

In this post, J.D. Lasica of Authors A.I. shares how artificial intelligence can help authors write a better novel and questions whether A.I. could be a boon to future writers and authors.

Of all the sectors that artificial intelligence is disrupting—finance, health care, transportation—the creative art of fiction writing seems like the least likely candidate to be impacted by A.I. 

But A.I. has arrived like a gift-wrapped box on the doorstep of the author community. Should we open it up? Or do we need to worry that what’s inside will put authors out of a job?

(Why writers have a love-hate relationship with technology.)

It turns out that a new fiction-savvy bot is not out to take the place of the next Hemingway, Steinbeck, or Atwood. Nor is it out to displace editors or other humans.

The A.I. program, from the tech startup Authors A.I., was built to help the next generation of authors write great books, attract large readerships and maybe even hit the bestseller lists. And, yes, to help authors’ own careers.

Marlowe: A.I. created by authors

Many maverick fiction authors start writing their first manuscript thinking they’ll write a book that defies the rules and blazes a completely new path—wholly original, conventions be damned. They imagine writing a work of such staggering genius, as Dave Eggers might put it, that it could give birth to an entire sub-genre all its own.

Marlowe, the name the founders gave to the A.I., is adept at identifying the shortcomings of a fiction manuscript. She is programmed to send authors down the proper path. In the end, novel writing often involves a right way and a wrong way to tell a story. You don’t want to end your romance novel with a murder-suicide, no matter how brilliant your prose.

(Forced proximity: 50 reasons for your characters to be stuck together.)

That’s where artificial intelligence can help. Marlowe won’t write any passages for authors. But she has studied a large number of books that hit the bestseller lists and she’s reverse-engineered the components of popular novels that resonated with readers.

The best novels are those that meet certain reader expectations for their genre while delivering the story in a fresh and original way. That insight is liberating, because it frees authors to write books that delight readers instead of wasting time raging against literary conventions or the strictures of traditional editors.

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Plot structure and narrative arc

The first area where A.I. can help with storytelling is a sort of big-picture eye-of-God look at the plot structure and spine of a story.

Many of the best stories follow a certain playbook (“formula” is such a nasty word), with a beginning hook, an inciting event that propels the protagonist into the middle build, a midpoint shift that turns the story in an entirely new direction, an assortment of reversals and revelations, and a climactic buildup leading to an ending payoff.

Marlowe can identify these major plot points and tell at a glance whether they’re positioned correctly. (“What? My inciting incident happens at the 37% mark? That’s not good.”) She will point out the specific passage or line of dialogue where these major plot turns occur. She will tell authors if they have a sagging middle—and not because they’re spending too much time at the computer.

Authors who use Marlowe are running each draft of their manuscripts through her as they reposition chapters and major action scenes.

Pacing

It generally takes authors time and dedication to master the art of pacing. A story ebbs and flows. Authors may start out their novel in media res, with a big action scene, or at a more languid pace, focusing on world building or foreshadowing or fleshing out characters.

But even veteran authors have a hard time assessing whether they’ve properly spaced out their peaks and valleys—the spots where readers turn pages quickly or slowly. The most successful writers vary the pace of their story to provide variety, and also to provide relief to the reader. No one wants to read a thriller with 60 chapters of nonstop action and no letup. One of Marlowe’s most popular features is a visualization of a novel’s pacing.

Other attributes

Marlowe takes the pulse of major characters and lets authors know if they’ve done a good job providing enough variety through the actions they take. (As Henry James said, plot is the act of putting characters under pressure.) Unlike feedback from critique groups, who are unfailingly polite, Marlowe has no hesitation in pointing out that a hero is too passive or a villain is way too much of a nice guy.

This A.I. breaks down the ratio of dialogue versus narration in a work and compares the percentages to that of bestselling novels. Several authors have found, after using Marlowe, that they hadn’t realized they had tipped too far into dialogue when narrative summary was called for.

(Keys to realistic dialogue.)

It turns out that subject matter is a major determinant of whether a book becomes a bestseller—not the specific topic or theme of the book so much as the importance of streamlining the story so only one or two major subjects dominate instead of a lots of tangential side plots that dilute the main storyline. 

This is a tendency seen in a lot of debut novels where the author is tempted to draw from life experience and cram everything under the sun into an overstuffed narrative. William Faulkner put it well: “You must kill all your darlings.” With that awareness in mind, Marlowe charts out top subject matters and their presence in the novel.

The writing matters—a lot

Why do readers find themselves drawn to certain authors? The storytelling and imaginative subject matter, sure; but so does the writing. Marlowe can’t teach someone how to write, but she can point out where even veteran authors miss the mark.

Her cliché finder tells authors about that bird in the hand, but it’s up to them to decide if they should avoid clichés like the plague or are striking the right balance for readers.

She plays copy editor, too, pointing out not just misspellings, but your authorial tics—repetitive phrases, overused adjectives and adverbs, as well as use of the passive voice—and provides the reading grade level and complexity score for the book.

The goal: To advance authors’ careers

Fiction authors have seen the marketplace change radically in the past decade with the dawn of ebooks, self-publishing and, now, a boom in audiobooks.

It’s time to add artificial intelligence to the list.

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